You may have come across Edamame beans if you have eaten in Japanese restaurants, but these beans are becoming more and more popular in the UK. 

Edamame are young soybeans, usually still in the pod. Because the beans are young and green when they are picked, edamame soybeans are soft and edible, not hard and dry like the mature soybeans that are used to make soy milk and tofu. The Japanese name, edamame literally means, “twig bean” (eda = “twig” & mame = “bean”).

These beans are typically boiled and served with salt in Japan though there are hundreds of ways to serve and eat them.

Edamame For Healthy Skin

Collagen is the fibrous protein that keeps skin firm, youthful-looking and wrinkle-free. Many begin to see the effects of collagen loss during their mid to late thirties. Eating edamame and other soyfoods may help to preserve skin-firming collagen because it’s rich in isoflavones.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, mice fed isoflavones and exposed to ultraviolet radiation had fewer wrinkles and smoother skin than mice that were exposed to UV light but didn’t get isoflavones. The researchers believe that isoflavones help prevent collagen breakdown.

Edamame beans are now available in Japanese and Chinese Supermarkets, and in some larger mainstream Supermarkets. They can also be bought online. Why not try our great and simple recipe for Garlic Edamame.

Garlic Edamame

Note: This recipe uses frozen edamame beans. If you have fresh beans, cook till tender and follow as normal.

  • 1 Bag of frozen edamame (with shells)
  • 3-4 Cloves of fresh garlic, finely minced
  • 1 Teaspoon of red pepper flakes
  • 2 Teaspoons oil (olive, vegetable, or sesame all work–I used vegetable oil)
  • 1 Teaspoon soy sauce
  • Corse sea salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste

Cook the frozen edamame according to the package. In a non-stick pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot enough, throw in the minced garlic and red pepper flakes. Cook until the garlic is just starting to brown (remove from heat immediately so you don’t burn the garlic).

In the same pan, add the edamame and mix everything well so that the pods are nicely coated with the garlic/red pepper flake mixture. Turn the burner back on low while constantly tossing the edamame. Drizzle the soy sauce over the pods and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook for about another minute to warm the soy beans.

Remove from heat and serve immediately.